The Future



DAFT PUNK EAT YOUR HEART OUT

KIEL JOHNSON - SHOOT DAY W/ROGER.TV

KIEL JOHNSON - SHOOT DAY W/ROGER.TV

KIEL JOHNSON - SHOOT DAY W/ROGER.TV

KIEL JOHNSON - SHOOT DAY W/ROGER.TV

KIEL JOHNSON - SHOOT DAY W/ROGER.TV

KIEL JOHNSON - SHOOT DAY W/ROGER.TV

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Pepsi Expands Refresh Project

Social-Media Experiment Becomes Full-Blown Global Marketing Strategy

For those of you who are not familiar with the Pepsi Refresh Project Pepsi decided to give away millions of dollars each month to fund “refreshing ideas” that change the world INSTEAD of dropping those millions of dollars on expensive advertisements during the Superbowl.

This is kind of huge.

Especially because it was successful.

Each “refreshing idea” had to be voted on via social media and the ideas with the most votes received grants. The reason this is so huge is not necessarily because social media was extraordinarily successful at disseminating the Pepsi brand, but because good ideas to change the world were so popular that Pepsi reached a wider and greater audience than they would during the Superbowl – which is watched by ba-gillions of people!

I think this is more than a marketing success story. I think this has the potential to inspire major corporations and advertisers to invest in positive social change – because people are paying attention to social change. Personally, I don’t care if social change comes with a Pepsi logo!



“Every Single Thing You See Is Future Trash. Everything.”

That’s Robin Nagle, the New York City Department of Sanitation’s anthropologist-in-residence, talking to The Believer about our relationship with trash, and what our garbage says about us. The interview is fascinating, and some of Nagle’s words are just revelatory.

BLVR: You, and William Rathje also, see [garbage] as also a cognitive problem.

RN: Well, it’s cognitive in that exact way: that it is quite highly visible, and constant, and invisibilized. So from the perspective of an anthropologist, or a psychologist, or someone trying to understand humanness: What is that thing? What is that mental process where we invisibilize something that’s present all the time?

The other cognitive problem is: Why have we developed, or, rather, why have we found ourselves implicated in a system that not only generates so much trash, but relies upon the accelerating production of waste for its own perpetuation? Why is that OK?

And a third cognitive problem is: Every single thing you see is future trash. Everything. So we are surrounded by ephemera, but we can’t acknowledge that, because it’s kind of scary, because I think ultimately it points to our own temporariness, to thoughts that we’re all going to die.

Some other interesting points: Humans are some of the only animals not attracted to garbage’s smells and odors. Modern cities are quite literally built on trash—and trash’s role in urban topography can’t be overstated. In the past, cities used to stink. Not only that, but they were so full of waste and excrement, that they were hotbeds of disease. Modern sanitation, according to Nagle, is as vital a public service as the work done by police or fire departments. Sanitation workers, therefore, deserve far more prestige and reverence than they currently enjoy.

Photo (cc) by Flickr user D’Arcy Norman

DBlawg reports on ways you can create LESS or even ZERO waste at home! Check this out (CLICK HERE)



How to Achieve Zero Waste at Home in Six Steps

Zero Waste is more than just a visionary goal– it’s a practice that’s easier to adopt than you may think. The basic principle is that nothing should be thrown into landfills– that everything is somehow reused or repurposed. There’s no better place to take the practical steps towards zero waste than in your own home. We talked to Steven Mandzik, founder of A Clean Life and Zero Waste expert, about how to cut your household’s trash down to nothing.

CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW!


http://www.waitingforsuperman.com/

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